Ae105 Overview

  2016-2017 Ae105 class celebrating a successful end of the year final project reviews

2016-2017 Ae105 class celebrating a successful end of the year final project reviews

                AAReST telescope testbed used by Ae105 students for testing end-to-end telescope performance.

               AAReST telescope testbed used by Ae105 students for testing end-to-end telescope performance.

Aerospace Engineering (Ae) 105 is a core component of the Masters Degree Program in Space Engineering. The course is sectioned into two components. The first is focused on the fundamental components of spacecraft engineering: mission design, structural dynamics, orbital mechanics and guidance navigation & control (GNC). The course is instructed by JPL engineers who offer insight into real-world problems. For the second half of the course, students collaborate with each other, along with GALCIT researchers on the AAReST mission. Several design areas are stressed with this project: spacecraft analysis and design, optics/telescope design and testing, composite boom testing, telescope software architecture, and electronics design. Students make significant contributions to these design areas, ultimately furthering the status of the mission as a whole.

  Ae105 students testing boom accuracy with a FARO arm after vibration testing.

Ae105 students testing boom accuracy with a FARO arm after vibration testing.

Current Tasks:

  • Overall mission design (mass/power budget, orbit selection, mission requirements)
  • Spacecraft structural design and analysis
  • Hardware selection for satellite
  • Development of GNC simulator for spacecraft
  • Spacecraft modelling in STK (power, communications, and docking analysis)
  • Design, fabrication, and testing of solar panels and antennas
  • Development of flight software

Previous Tasks:

  •  
  • Telescope architecture
  • Telescope optics design (Zemax simulations)
  • Preliminary thermal analysis
  • Deployable boom design
  • Mechanical design of camera and mirror box flight hardware
  • Design of electromagnetic docking mechanism
  • Autonomous reconfiguration algorithms (2D air-table experiments)
  • Fabrication of deformable mirrors
  • Flight qualification of deployable boom (dynamic deployment experiments, vibration testing)
  • Flight qualification of camera and mirror boxes (thermal and vibration testing)
  • Development of spacecraft electronics
  • End-to-end testing of telescope

Ae105 Instructors:

  • Tony Freeman
  • Daniel Scharf
  • Oscar Alvarez-Salazar